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What is Ordinary Time?

What is Ordinary Time?

According to Ecclesiastes 3:1 and the song by The Byrds, “To everything there is a season.” In much of the Church, we observe the seasons of the two great cycles of the Church Year: Advent and Christmas, Lent and Easter. But there are “in between” times which are sometimes counted as “ordinary.” In the Roman Catholic Church, the Sundays after the Feast of the Epiphany and after the Feast of the Pentecost are considered “ordinary time.” Episcopalians are more likely

In Epiphany We Trace, All the Glory of His Grace

In Epiphany We Trace, All the Glory of His Grace

  With the First Sunday in Advent, we begin one of two major cycles of the Church year: Advent-Christmas-Epiphany (the Incarnation Cycle). The other major cycle is Lent-Holy Week-Easter (the Paschal or Resurrection Cycle). In our liturgies, seasonal changes in scripture readings, liturgical texts, music and practice, along with colors and ornamentation, reveal each season’s meaning within the overall shape of the cycle of which it is a part. Advent means “arrival” and “coming.” Advent’s readings weave together the three